Aloud Blog

April 26, 2010
After Women's History month in March, and having attended so many women’s events, I find myself reflecting on “the tipping point.” In many ways, we are at its cusp, with people of both genders recognizing that the empowerment of women and girls is...
April 22, 2010
Buying “stuff” may be good for the economy — but it’s awful for the environment. Just ask Annie Leonard. As Director of The Story of Stuff Project, she’s built a career spreading the word that our constant consumption of “stuff” is destroying our...
April 15, 2010
It’s April 15 and with the 40th Matrix Awards ceremony just a few days away, it’s a good time to review what’s been happening with women’s income over the last four decades. We have good news and bad news. As the U.S. Census Bureau chart below...
April 12, 2010
On Monday, April 19, New York Women in Communications will host our 40th Annual Matrix Awards ceremony. Throughout this month, Aloud will look at some of the changes in women’s lives in those four decades. Today’s topic: changes in women’s...
March 31, 2010
Esther Chavez marshaled determination and communications skills to bring the plight of the disappeared and murdered women of Juarez, Mexico, to the attention of the world. The girls were strewn in a dusty irrigation ditch in an unused cotton field...
March 30, 2010
When we think of women pioneers in broadcasting, the image that comes to many is Barbara Walters when she joined Harry Reasoner at the ABC Evening News desk in 1976. But long before flickering televisions lit up Americans’ living rooms, a woman...
March 29, 2010
Loni Ding, who died at age 78, on February 20, 2010, was an Emmy award-winning documentary filmmaker and activist who produced such groundbreaking PBS documentary series as Ancestors in the Americas, The Color of Honor and Nisei Soldier: Standard...
March 27, 2010
Jane Addams — activist, social worker, reformer and winner of the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize — was a humanitarian in every sense of the word. She founded the settlement house movement in the U.S., laying the foundations of our social service...
March 26, 2010
Let's face it. Lynching is one of the most shameful parts of our country's history, and you’ll rarely see it mentioned in our history textbooks. Ida B. Wells (1862 – 1931) risked her life to stop this violent and repulsive act. And not only that —...
March 25, 2010
Long before the 1970s, the golden era of investigative journalism when all those cool male undercover reporters made long-form reporting fashionable — there was Nellie Bly. She was the pioneer in investigative reporting. She was a woman. And the...
March 24, 2010
It is safe to say that poetry was Gwendolyn Brooks’ true native language. Her first poem, Eventide, was published in American Childhood magazine when she was just 13. She published her first book of poetry, A Street in Bronzeville, at age 28....
March 23, 2010
Geraldine Ferraro, born in 1935 and raised in working-class Bronx and Queens neighborhoods, was the first in her family to graduate college. She attended Marymount Manhattan College, on a scholarship no less, where she was the editor of the school...
March 21, 2010
Liz Carpenter — journalist, speechwriter, feminist, White House staff member, witness to history and lifelong activist — died on Saturday, March 20 of pneumonia. She was 89. She was perhaps the last of a generation of outspoken, sometimes outrageous...
March 19, 2010
“Pioneering” and “first” are words closely associated with Fortuna Calvo-Roth, past president of New York Women In Communications (NYWICI) from 1991-1992. As editor-in-chief of Vision — named by Time magazine as "the leading Latin American...
March 16, 2010
Eugene Speicher, a former classmate at the Art Students League, once said to Georgia O’Keeffe, “I'm going to be a great painter, and you will probably end up teaching painting in some girl's school.” Well Eugene, it appears your prediction was a bit...

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